Are You Being Emotionally Abused By A Sociopath? Here’s What You Need To Know

Are You Being Emotionally Abused By A Sociopath? Here’s What You Need To Know

Emotional Abuse and Sociopaths

“It is not the the bruises on the body that hurt. It is the wounds of the heart and the scars on the mind.” – Aisha Mirza

Are you constantly fighting with a sociopath? Is the toxicity of the relationship making you feel disgusted and broken?

Sociopaths are experts in emotional and psychological abuse. They use a number of tools like gaslighting, triangulation, stonewalling and smear campaigns to control and manipulate you. As they feel a high sense of entitlement and lack empathy, they can easily exploit the people close to them to meet their needs.

However, most of the victims ignore the red flags that they are being abused by a narcissistic sociopath and tell themselves that they are overreacting. But when you listen to your inner voice, you will realize that you are in a toxic and emotionally abusive relationship with a sociopath.

Emotional abuse is a part of life with a narcissistic user.
This is what life is if we’re ensnared by them.

Emotional abuse comes in many flavors. It always comes along with entanglement with a narcissistic user, the predatory sociopath. When a normal person and a sociopath mix, the collision of the normal human brain, and the person with the brain of a pathological sociopath in their head, is inevitable harm to the normal person. And sickeningly, it’s absolute run-of-the-mill, just another day to the sociopath.

There’s nothing else going on in a love scam with a pathological user other than us being used. They need to keep abreast of where we are so we don’t surprise them and catch them red-handed. They want all the money for themselves. They don’t care about what concerns us.

 

Emotional Abuse and Sociopath, Narcissistic Users are a Package Deal

“There are far too many silent sufferers. Not because they don’t yearn to reach out, but because they’ve tried and found no one who cares.” – Richelle E. Goodrich

Once we’re involved and in love, the inevitable fallout of the mix of a normal human and a sociopath is a shock and harm to us… and nothing new, and not at all hurtful for them.

This mind-bending, confusing, collision of a sociopath and a normal person can make us think there’s something wrong with us. There is not. There’s something very, very wrong with a sociopath.

 

Emotional Abuse Signifies This is Not an Ordinary Relationship.

As normal, gorgeous humans, we think we’re in a real relationship. Naturally, we do what normal people do in real relationships. The sociopath does not. Their odd behavior, unresponsiveness and sometimes outright meanness trips us up – we try, we try to make things better: as anyone would in a relationship.

In the beginning, a sociopath gauges what matters to us. They fulfill that. As the weeks go by, they discern what we won’t tolerate or forgive, what will keep us trusting, even when they become neglectful or mean. They innately know, or simply guess until they get it right and discover which behavior of theirs will bend us to their will most effectively.

“Do you never look at yourself when you abuse another person?” – Plautus

Think of These As Crimes Rather Than Relationships: The Fog Clears

In reality, we’ve been hijacked, kidnapped without realizing it. We’re not with a normal person, sociopaths have abnormal brains. As a sociopath goes about their day in the world they present a false self, even the barista or car wash attendant isn’t seeing a real person. The sociopath is constantly putting on a fake front as best they can.

 

Normal Means Relationship Building is Ongoing From Both Sides

We try to keep things harmonious, humans need harmony within their lives and relationships. If both people were normal, both people would contribute to harmony within the relationship, this is not the case with a sociopath.

While we pitch-in and spend a lot of effort self-reflecting, wondering if “it’s our fault,” and trying to make things right, work out the kinks, adjust our perception of what a relationship – this relationship – should be and continue to relationship-build, it takes a while to notice, we’re doing it alone.

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