Why Intelligent People Can't find Happiness

“The intelligent mind knows everything but what’s good for it. The happy mind knows what’s good for it above everything.”

Happiness and intelligence are mutually exclusive because happiness is a state of mind whereas intelligence is a scope of mind – the former being more fixed and the latter more fluid.

If you think you have raised the bar with your intelligence and resilience then you could be in for trouble when you are claiming to be so publicly. Intelligent people often feel personal affront when they self actualize their intelligence. In fact, intelligence is a social construct that is problematic.

Here are the reasons why a lot of intelligent and sober souls do not find happiness:

1) Intelligent People Have High Standards:

Having standards is a good thing. It can help you stay on a positive path to happiness and success. Setting standards that are too high however, can become a problem. Intelligent people tend to know what they want, and they refuse to settle for less. Their high standards apply to every area of their life. Jobs, relationships, certain goals. This can make it harder for them to be satisfied. They may constantly feel like their achievements aren’t enough, or that their job isn’t allowing them to get ahead. Their standards can also significantly affect their relationships.

2) Intelligent people acknowledge things as they are rather than applying knowledge to them with hopes of what they could be.

When “happy,” your mind is likely fixed – focused on the present moment  When your awareness supersedes knowledge then what you do or do not know is irrelevant, simply because your attention is completely attuned to whatever is really happening. In other words, you are

3) Intelligent minds are not satisfied with the present moment as it is, it constantly tries to find more meaning to it.

When “intelligent,” awareness loses precedence to knowledge. Our minds are not satisfied with the present moment as it is and so either wanders away or abandons it entirely, adds or subtracts from it, refines or reframes it, understands or interprets it, etc. The mind tries to “edit” the moment and apply meaning to it because the moment in and of itself is not enough.

This dissatisfaction starts the mind on a desperate race to access and acquire all of the information and memories it has stored to make the moment “better.” And during this process the mind becomes impatient, frantic, or lost, because its findings prove insufficient or it fails to find anything at all. And because its current resources fail to suffice, it goes off and searches for even more, Googling and reading and writing and wandering, because what is is simply not enough.

4) Happiness is the mind that settles; intelligence is the mind that refuses to settle.

For the happy mind, however, whatever is- is enough. It doesn’t seek to alter it; it just accepts it and acts accordingly. The intelligent mind is not so easy to please and will think the happy mind complacent, if not lazy

5) Most intelligent people over think things:

Highly intelligent people have a tendency to constantly analyze and scrutinize to the point of exhaustion. They will weigh the pros and cons and judge after quietly withdrawing themselves. This often results in depression. They often get the answers to most questions plaguing them. Continuous answers can be really unpleasant and can wrack them with negativity and despondency leading to disappointing outcomes.