How Shutting Down Body-Shaming Is Crucial For Body Positivity

Shutting Down Body Shaming

He goes on to say, “No one is perfect, so putting that image up before women and young girls, making it the standard of beauty, is deceitful and just a blatant lie. It is not the model’s truth. I feel like if companies were honest, then everyone else could be honest about their own bodies.”

Want to know more about shutting down body-shaming? Check this video out below!

Shutting down body-shaming

One study explored how our ideal of beauty has historically been shaped by social context—and has been historically difficult to achieve. “Current mass media is ubiquitous and powerful, leading to increased body dissatisfaction among both men and women,” according to the authors of the study, Jennifer L. Derenne, M.D., and Eugene V. Beresin, M.D., M.A.

In looking at potential avenues for change, they suggest that parents limit their children’s exposure to media, and they recommend instead encouraging physical activity and participation in other activities that increase self-esteem.

Perhaps all of us should take this advice. While it’s true that we can control what we watch on TV and which magazines we choose to read, some exposure to these harmful messages can’t be avoided.

Related: How To Help A Partner Struggling With Body Issues and Insecurities

If you’ve ever ridden the subway in New York City, for example, you’ve likely been barraged by a number of ads telling women how they should look, including a breast augmentation ad with a frowning woman holding small tangerines over her breasts, followed by a happier version of herself with giant grapefruits. (Petitions to have the ads taken down were unsuccessful.)

Hopefully, with continued movements toward body positivity, the trend will begin to shift from body-shaming to celebrating women of all sizes, shapes, colors, and bra sizes.

Or as Anderson says, “When the perfect image begins to be portrayed as a person with a healthy and fit body, mind and, soul, we’ll discover the real image of beauty.”

References:

Grabe, S.; Ward, L. M; Hyde, J.S. (2008). The Role of the Media in Body Image Concerns among Women: A Meta-Analysis of Experimental and Correlational Studies.Psychological Bulletin, v134 n3

Written By Allison Abrams  
Originally Published In Psychology Today
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