How Shutting Down Body-Shaming Is Crucial For Body Positivity

Shutting Down Body Shaming

Shutting Down Body-Shaming Is Crucial

One of the best ways of promoting body positivity, and encouraging a positive body image in the mind of every woman, is by shutting down the cruel mindset and practice of body-shaming.

Multiple studies have shown the negative impact of the media on body image. Exposure to photoshopped images of unrealistic body ideals has been linked to low self-esteem, depression, and eating disorders. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), at least 30 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S., resulting in at least one death every 62 minutes. In a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, negative body image was determined to be a predictor of suicidal thoughts among college students, especially among young women.

A new law in France is now attempting to tackle what has become a public health issue in that country as well, where over 600,000 people suffer from anorexia or other eating disorders.

The law, which went into effect this week, requires media images that are digitally altered to make models look thinner to be labeled as such. According to the French Ministry of Health, “It will be mandatory to use the label ‘retouched photo’ alongside any photo used for commercial purposes when the body of a model has been modified by an image-editing software to either slim or flesh out her figure.”

Following suit, Getty Images, one of the largest stock photo agencies in the U.S., has just banned submissions of any images that have been doctored to make models appear smaller or larger, an “industry first,” according to B&T magazine. “Accurate, healthy depiction in advertising imagery has a direct correlation on fighting stereotypes,” they add, “creating tolerance and empowering communities.”

“Warning labels are a good start,” says child and adolescent psychiatrist Gayani DeSilva, M.D. “For girls, this little reality check can slow down the process of becoming conditioned to unrealistic expectations about their bodies.” She describes Getty’s ban as an even more effective move to impede the objectification of women and halt the development of self-loathing in girls and women. “Any time people internalize an impossible-to-attain goal, it leads to feeling inadequate and developing poor self-esteem. A warning label is a small but important step in pausing that internalization process.”

Related: 5 Ways To Stop Your Inner Critic In Its Tracks

“We have become a society of unreal expectations and images. Retouched images falsely portray young and older women with a sense of perfection that is beyond reach,” says Dr. Lynn Anderson, Ph.D., naturopath, and yoga therapist. “It is not only sculpting the body but false images of wrinkle-free, flawless skin and long, flowing hair that affect how we see ourselves.”

She says we should be promoting health and fitness instead of skin and bones as the ideal. “When it comes to eating disorders, we can’t blame photo retouching and model images as the only cause,” Anderson acknowledges. “We need to address the real issue, and that is mental health, self-esteem, and self-worth. So perhaps the laws need to take it a bit further and focus on being healthy and not falsely perfect.”

Unrealistic expectations of women for men and boys

Both DeSilva and Anderson pointed to the fact that women and girls are not the only ones to internalize these impossible standards; boys and men begin to hold them up to these standards as well, believing what they see in media.

Health and wellness coach Kevin Bailey also agrees. “Some men feel like their ideal woman should look like that retouched model as well. They begin to search for a perfect body that does not exist.” He adds that this not only hurts the woman but also the man who may miss out on a perfect match for himself because “he is looking for a unicorn. If he does not change the image of what he is looking for in a woman, he will be chasing a dream for the rest of his life, [and end up] a lonely old man.”

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Allison Abrams, LCSW-R

Allison Abrams, LCSW-R, is a licensed psychotherapist in NYC, mental health advocate, author and contributing writer for Psychology Today, The Huffington Post, Verywell, Thrive Global, and Good Therapy. She is a media expert for outlets such as USA Today, Women's Day, Reader's Digest, Prevention, Yahoo, Washington Post, Business Insider, NBC, Elite Daily, and Livestrong. Allison is passionate about empowering men and women to overcome adversity and gain the confidence needed to thrive and achieve success.View Author posts