Incompletions: 8 Steps to Overcome Differences With Your Partner

Incompletions in relationships- Unfinished business, unresolved issues, emotional baggage, irreconcilable differences, misunderstandings—call them what you will, but they’re not good for relationships.

We call them incompletions, which seems like a fitting term since their presence leaves us feeling like there’s something missing, unfinished, or incomplete in our relationships. What’s missing is the feeling that things are okay between us, that our connection is complete as is, and that nothing needs to be done or said in order for each of us to feel secure and at peace at this time.

When we feel incomplete, there is a gnawing sense that something is not okay and we don’t feel a sense of ease, trust, and connection.

Some couples experience a pervasive sense of incompletion because they have failed to adequately address and come to terms with the broken places between them and now believe that feeling to be the norm—they no longer even expect to experience anything else.

This perception is not only unfortunate and painful; it’s also dangerous since it can lead to a self-fulfilling prophecy that solidifies that belief into a permanent reality.

Incompletions occur whenever an issue isn’t sufficiently addressed in a way that both partners feel that it is, at least for the time being, settled.

This doesn’t necessarily mean that it is resolved and reconciled once and for all; rather, there is a sense of acceptance of things as they are and there are no unspoken feelings of resentment or disappointment being withheld.

When an incompletion doesn’t get addressed in an open and timely way, it impairs our ability to experience deep connection, intimacy, and empathy in our relationship.

Like an undisposed bucket of garbage in the kitchen, the longer it sits there, the more foul it becomes. In our efforts to avoid opening up a can of worms, many of us instead build up a tolerance to the smell rather than taking it out. Developing this tolerance, though, diminishes our motivation to clean up—and the vicious circle remains unbroken.

Getting complete requires the willingness to risk upsetting the apple cart, something we are more inclined to risk if we trust that we can repair any harm or damage caused in the process.

If we are inexperienced in the skillful management of differences, though, we’re not likely to have much confidence that the process will lead to a successful outcome. All the more reason to learn how to handle incompletions. Although there may be uncomfortable moments, we are much more likely to become more skilled in this work by addressing issues directly when they arise, rather than avoiding them.

 

Here are 8 guidelines you might find useful: Steps to Overcome Differences With Your Partner

1. Acknowledge to your partner that you have an incompletion.

This can be a simple statement, such as “There’s something that I feel unfinished about and I’d like to speak with you about it. Is this a good time?”

 

2. If your partner says yes, go to step 3. If he or she says no, seek agreement on a time convenient for both of you.

Be specific and make sure that you both have adequate time available to do the matter justice. Assume the conversation will take longer than you think.

 

3. To begin the conversation, state your intention.

It should be something that will ultimately benefit you both, such as, “My hope in having us both address my concern is that I can feel more complete and that we can both experience greater trust and understanding with each other.”

 

Linda and Charlie Bloom
Linda Bloom, LCSW and Charlie Bloom, MSW have been trained as psychotherapists and relationship counselors and have worked with individuals, couples, groups, and organizations since 1975. They have lectured and taught at universities and learning institutes throughout the USA, including the Esalen Institute, the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health, 1440 Multiversity, and many others.  They have taught seminars in many countries throughout the world. They have co-authored four books, 101 Things I Wish I Knew When I Got Married: Simple Lessons to Make Love Last, Secrets of Great Marriages: Real Truth From Real Couples About Lasting Love, Happily Ever After And 39 Other Myths About Love, and That Which Doesn't Kill Us: How One Couple Became Stronger at the Broken Places. They have been married since 1972 and are the parents of two adult children and three grandsons. Linda and Charlie live in Santa Cruz, California. Their website is www.bloomwork.com

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