6 Steps to Mindfully Deal With Difficult Emotions in Relationships

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Mindfully Deal With Difficult Emotions in Relationships



Six easy steps to deal with Difficult Emotions in Relationships!

Let’s get real here.

For most of us – myself included – life is fast-paced and chock full of family, relationship, and work stressors.

This reality, along with the ever-increasing pressures of technology and society at large, can really take a toll on your marriage.

As a result, difficult emotions like anger, confusion, fear, loneliness, and sadness, just to name a few, can arise. Emotions like these are often the most present and powerful forces in your life.

The key to overcoming these difficult emotions is mindfulness! Practicing mindfulness enables you to calm down and soothe yourself. In this state, you have space to reflect and thoughtfully respond, rather than react.

Following these six steps will help you to understand and deal with your difficult emotions in a mindful way:

1. Turn toward your emotions with acceptance

Once you become aware of the emotion you are feeling, notice where it is in your body. You may feel it as a stomach ache, a tightening of your throat, the pounding of your heart, or tension somewhere.

Sit with this anger, anxiety, depression, grief, guilt, sadness, shame, or whatever emotion you are experiencing. Become aware of it and don’t ignore it. If this is difficult, get up and walk around or get a cup of tea.

The key here is to not push the emotion away. Bottling it up inside will only cause it to bubble up and explode later, resulting in more difficult emotions or even a complete emotional shutdown. Listen to your difficult emotions. They are trying to help you wake up to what is going on before a major crisis occurs.

2. Identify and label the emotion

Instead of saying, “I am angry”, say, “This is anger” or, “This is anxiety.” In this way, you’re acknowledging its presence, while simultaneously empowering you to remain detached from it.




When my husband was in the hospital before he passed, I felt a deep sense of uncertainty, anxiety, and fear.

I needed to acknowledge and identify the emotions and say to myself,

“I know that I am experiencing anxiety and fear right now and I don’t know what will happen, but I am going to just ‘be’ with it.”

Although it remained an extremely painful experience to the end, identifying and labeling my emotions in this way allowed me to take some of the pain out of what I was feeling.

This, in turn, allowed me to stay in the present, versus catapulting me into the future, or trapping me in the past. Being thrust in either direction would have only caused me to blame myself. I can just imagine how that critical voice would have rung out, “If only you would have done something different, maybe there would have been a different outcome.”

3. Accept your emotions

When you are feeling a certain emotion, don’t deny it. Acknowledge and accept that the emotion is present, whether it is anxiety, grief, sadness, or whatever you are experiencing in that moment. Through mindful acceptance, you can embrace difficult feelings with compassion, awareness, and understanding towards yourself and your partner.