How Childhood Trauma Is Screwing Up Your Relationships

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How Childhood Trauma Is Screwing Up Your Relationships



Childhood abuse can impact our lives in ways we can’t even imagine at times. The trauma we experience as a child subconsciously makes us doubt love and relationships. It can even make us self sabotage our romantic relationships as an adult.

Childhood trauma is surprisingly common and understandably painful, but healing is possible.

I didn’t figure out what love wasn’t until I went through my tsunami of a divorce and came face-to-face with the ongoing trauma causing by experiences of childhood abuse — all at the same time.

You see, I was a victim (sorry, I hate that word, but it is what it is) of childhood abuse, what those in the clinical world refer to as Adverse Childhood Experiences.

 

What are Adverse Childhood Experiences?

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) definition, “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) is the term used to describe all types of abuse, neglect, and other potentially traumatic experiences that occur to people under the age of 18.”

The term originated in the 1990s, after Dr. Vincent Felitti, head of Kaiser Permanente’s Department of Preventive Medicine in San Diego, discovered a correlation between childhood trauma and unhealthy coping mechanisms “for depression, anxiety, and fear”.




The resulting ACE Study “has produced more than 50 articles that look at the prevalence and consequences of ACEs … Subsequent studies have confirmed the high frequency of adverse childhood experiences or found even higher incidences in urban or youth populations … [and the] original study questions have been used to develop a 10-item screening questionnaire.”

As NPR explains, “An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your score is likely to be and the higher your risk for later health problems.”

As it turns out, adverse childhood experiences are surprisingly common, with about two-thirds of survey respondents reporting experience with at least one of the following as a child:

  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Emotional abuse
  • Physical neglect
  • Emotional neglect
  • Exposure to domestic violence
  • Household substance abuse
  • Household mental illness
  • Parental separation or divorce
  • Incarcerated household member

Personally, I didn’t deal with my own childhood trauma until I was 39 years old, my marriage in tatters.

It wasn’t because I didn’t want to deal with what had happened to me, but rather because I only remembered it at the age of 29 while recovering in hospital after being hit by a car (gotta love the way the brain works).

Once I remembered, I tried keeping quiet about it for a decade.

Throughout my teens and early 20’s, I believed that in order to get love, I had to have sex with someone.

I didn’t realize this was how I was operating until I attended Tony Robbin’s Date With Destiny seminar. Since then, I’ve worked with many women who’ve been in physically and emotionally abusive relationships and can’t understand why they stayed as long as they did — until they look back and realize they grew up watching their father being emotionally and physically abusive to their mom.