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A Japanese Technique for Overcoming Laziness

“If you think adventure is dangerous, try routine; it is lethal.”
― Paulo Coelho

 

Have you felt that your life has become static? There is no change at all. You think you will try a fitness regime, learn a new language, play an instrument or simply keep a journal – but every time you postpone it. It’s either tomorrow or from Monday, next month or even next year… the goal moves further away. Breaking old habits and replacing them with new ones take time and patience. We simply love comfort.

Challenging yourself to do something is quite a task. We are bursting with enthusiasm in the beginning and gradually it fades away. We try to achieve a lot rapidly, which makes it all the more difficult. Sometimes you need to plan and ponder on your progress instead of expecting magic by waiting.

So why does this happen?

 It is impossible to find one definite cause. If your decisions were always taken by others since childhood, chances are you have no idea about your purpose in life or the power to change what you possess. Psychologists think that a person who is not very motivated is not capable of developing any habit in a short span.

 

Developing a habit takes at least 21 days. It will take 90 days to form a permanent habit. Going about any business requires skill and discipline. Take small steps at the beginning. “Plans Gromadyo” is a technique for the youth. With conviction and hormones raging in the blood, one can hardly stop midway. To turn off the chosen path seems unthinkable at this stage when one is full of possibilities.

 

With age, we develop a lot of habits and acquire tastes. Life becomes serious of complications one has to deal with. There is no end to one’s desires and often the willpower falls short. We begin in the natural course and tend to lose track as the task at hand becomes a burden, hence boring. Habits need nurturing and devotion.

Where is the way out?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Japanese philosophy kaizen is unique. It literally means “continuous improvement” from Japanese. “Kai” means change, and “zen” translates to wisdom. It proposes changes that are not made in flux but show reflection and ripe experience.

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