The Triangular Theory of Love

 April 28, 2019

The Love Triad



What is love made of?

The subject of love had always baffled us since time immemorial.

Love encompasses a range of a wide variety of strong emotions.  The answer to why we are attracted to someone, and the ingredients of a fruitful relationship had always eluded us.

According to Sigmund Freud love is a search for an “ego ideal”, the image of the person that one wants to become which is patterned after those whom one holds in good respect.

Abraham Maslow, the humanistic psychologist, believed love is possible only when one has reached self-actualization.

When theories about love moved from being clinically based to being socially and personally based, they become focused on types of love, as opposed to being able to love.

 

The Triangular Theory of Love or The Love Triad

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Robert Sternberg came up with a new theory of love, called The Triangular Theory of Love which is made up of 3 components:




  • Intimacy
  • Passion and
  • commitment.

Each component stands as a generic combination of feelings that give rise to different types of love.

Although everyone‘s thoughts on what makes them drawn to another person are different. However the attachment that we feel towards another person is common to all.

This attachment that we feel towards another person is based on physical and emotional connection. This connection is difficult to explain since there are a number of factors that may influence.

1. Intimacy:

Intimacy refers to feelings of closeness, connectedness, and bondedness in loving relationships. It thus includes within its purview those feelings that give rise, essentially, to the experience of warmth in a loving relationship.

In intimacy there is a sense of high regard for each other .There is a  definite wish to make each other happy , communicate with each other and help each other in need.

Sternberg’s prediction of this love was that it would diminish as the relationship became less interrupted, thus increasing predictability.

 

2. Passion:

Passion refers to the drives that lead to romance, physical attraction, sexual consummation, and related phenomena in loving relationships.  This is associated with strong feelings of love and desire for a specific person. This love is full of excitement and newness.

Passionate love is important in the beginning of the relationship and typically lasts for about a year. There is a chemical component to passionate love. Those experiencing passionate love are also experiencing increased neurotransmitters, specifically phenylethylamine.

 




3. Decision/commitment:

Decision/commitment refers, in the short-term, to the decision that one loves a certain other, and in the long-term, to one’s commitment to maintain that love.  These two aspects of the decision/commitment component do not necessarily go together, in that one can decide to love someone without being committed to the love in the long-term, or one can be committed to a relationship without acknowledging that one loves the other person in the relationship.

 

Implications of The Triangular Theory of Love in relationships

According to Robert Sternberg ,  the three components of love interact with each other:  For example, greater intimacy may lead to greater passion or commitment, just as greater commitment may lead to greater intimacy, or with lesser likelihood, greater passion.




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