7 Ways Forgiveness Can Transform Your Marriage

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By Terry Gaspard, MSW, LICSW

Recent studies have shown that forgiveness is an essential component of successful romantic relationships. In fact, the capacity to seek and grant forgiveness is one of the most significant factors contributing to marital satisfaction and a lifetime of love.

Forgiving yourself and others is about being willing to acknowledge that you are capable of being wounded. It also means that you are willing to step out from the role of victim and take charge of your life.

Couples who practice forgiveness can rid themselves of the toxic hurt and shame that holds them back from feeling connected to each other.

In The Science of Trust, Dr. John Gottman explains that emotional attunement is a skill that allows couples to fully process and move on from negative emotional events, and ultimately create a stronger bond.

Resentment Leads to Emotional and sexual Distance

Abby has felt resentment and anger towards her husband Rob ever since she found out he has been communicating with his ex-girlfriend Samantha through text messages and emails. Rob has apologized and accepted responsibility for his actions, but Abby is unwilling to forgive him.




Over the last two months, Abby has shut down sexually and emotionally. She’s been giving Rob the silent treatment and has told him repeatedly that she’s unsure about his commitment to their marriage.

Abby puts it like this: “Rob says they’re just friends but I don’t buy it. I just can’t seem to get over my feelings of resentment toward him. During our marriage, we’ve gotten over many hurdles, including adjusting to crazy work schedules and trouble with in-laws. But this issue is too big.”

The problem with holding on to resentment toward your partner is that it often leads to withdrawal and a lack of vulnerability. Over time, this can erode trust. In Abby’s case, she has been bottling up feelings of anger and resentment for some time and she’s lost trust in Rob’s intentions.

In an effort to protect herself, Abby is unwilling to engage in what Dr. John Gottman refers to as repair attempts with Rob. This couple is stuck in a negative pattern of interaction and Abby is not acting with goodwill toward Rob – an essential element of a successful marriage.

Abby continues: “I can’t get over the fact that Rob has been communicating with Stephanie behind my back. It’s such a betrayal. I found out about it by reading a text message and recognized her name immediately. Even though I knew they were still friends, it hurts that he was hiding being in touch since she moved back home.”




Is it possible for Abby to rebuild trust in Rob after feeling betrayed? Gradually, Rob must be willing to put his relationship with Abby first and demonstrate trustworthiness through his words and actions. Abby would be wise to extend trust to Rob and not automatically assume the worst. In time, she may rebuild trust by taking responsibility for her own reactions and changing her mistrustful mindset.

For instance, if Abby is thinking like a forgiving person, she might adopt a perspective that assumes it’s possible that Rob simply made an error in judgment by not telling her about his contact with his ex. Or, it’s possible he believed he couldn’t be completely open and honest with Abby because she expressed jealousy in the past (about his ex) and he feared losing her.