How To Fall in Love With Anyone

How To Fall in Love With Anyone

The moments I found most uncomfortable were not when I had to make confessions about myself, but had to venture opinions about my partner.

For example: “Alternate sharing something you consider a positive characteristic of your partner, a total of five items” (Question 22), and

“Tell your partner what you like about them; be very honest this time saying things you might not say to someone you’ve just met” (Question 28).

(Read more on – 10 Questions To Ask To Go Deep In Your Relationship)

Much of Dr. Aron’s research focuses on creating interpersonal closeness. In particular, several studies investigate the ways we incorporate others into our sense of self. It’s easy to see how the questions encourage what they call “self-expansion.” Saying things like, “I like your voice, your taste in beer, the way all your friends seem to admire you,” makes certain positive qualities belonging to one person explicitly valuable to the other.

It’s astounding, really, to hear what someone admires in you. I don’t know why we don’t go around thoughtfully complimenting one another all the time.

We finished at midnight, taking far longer than the 90 minutes for the original study. Looking around the bar, I felt as if I had just woken up. “That wasn’t so bad,” I said. “Definitely less uncomfortable than the staring into each other’s eyes part would be.”

He hesitated and asked. “Do you think we should do that, too?”

“Here?” I looked around the bar. It seemed too weird, too public.

“We could stand on the bridge,” he said, turning toward the window.

The night was warm and I was wide-awake. We walked to the highest point, then turned to face each other. I fumbled with my phone as I set the timer

“O.K.,” I said, inhaling sharply.

“O.K.,” he said, smiling.

I’ve skied steep slopes and hung from a rock face by a short length of rope, but staring into someone’s eyes for four silent minutes was one of the more thrilling and terrifying experiences of my life. I spent the first couple of minutes just trying to breathe properly. There was a lot of nervous smiling until, eventually, we settled in.

I know the eyes are the windows to the soul or whatever, but the real crux of the moment was not just that I was really seeing someone, but that I was seeing someone really seeing me. Once I embraced the terror of this realization and gave it time to subside, I arrived somewhere unexpected.

To fall in love

I felt brave, and in a state of wonder. Part of that wonder was at my own vulnerability and part was the weird kind of wonder you get from saying a word over and over until it loses its meaning and becomes what it actually is: an assemblage of sounds.

So it was with the eye, which is not a window to anything but rather a clump of very useful cells. The sentiment associated with the eye fell away and I was struck by its astounding biological reality: the spherical nature of the eyeball, the visible musculature of the iris and the smooth wet glass of the cornea. It was strange and exquisite.

When the timer buzzed, I was surprised — and a little relieved. But I also felt a sense of loss. Already I was beginning to see our evening through the surreal and unreliable lens of retrospect.

Most of us think “to fall in love” as something that happens to us. We fall. We get crushed.

But what I like about this study is how it assumes that love is an action. It assumes that what matters to my partner matters to me because we have at least three things in common, because we have close relationships with our mothers, and because he let me look at him.

12 thoughts on “How To Fall in Love With Anyone”

  1. The article is cute, the study, perhaps, more interesting. What is missing from the narrative is that, based on what I read, these two people were attracted to each other in the first place. So perhaps “anyone” is a bit of a stretch, it should be qualified with “anyone who you are appropriately attracted to and is also attracted to you.” I suspect that the study stated similar constraints more clearly.

    Don’t misunderstand me here, I do think that the basic idea is valid, that vulnerability and empathy are intrinsically linked with what we like to call “love”, I just have my doubts that this works well when other factors induce stronger feelings about another person.

    1. There is no guarantee that feelings will remain till long .. As due to many reasons … Circumstances … Faith…
      It’s some time illusion .. About unconditional Love

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