How to Keep Moving on When You’re Feeling Depressed

How to Keep Moving on When You're Feeling Depressed

Has your life gotten to that place where you’re feeling depressed all the time?

Are you feeling hopeless and full of dread and worried about what the future will hold?

If you are, I am so sorry. Being depressed and hopeless is a horrible place to be!

 

Fortunately, there are things you can do to keep moving on when you’re feeling depressed and like you always will be.

#1 – Assess the situation.

There are two kinds of depression, situational and chemical. They have similar symptoms but different causes. Knowing what kind of depression you have is the first step to dealing with it.

Situational depression is caused by something that happens in your life. When something big happens that makes you sad, like the death of a parent or a divorce or the loss of a job, you can become situationally depressed. This kind of depression usually has a beginning, caused by a specific event, and an end, and is often treated differently from chemical depression.

Chemical depression is the result of your brain chemistry being off in such a way that leads to depression. You are most often born with chemical depression but it can also be caused by a traumatic life event.

Chemical depression can happen to you even if your life is going great.

So, ask yourself some questions about what your life looks like these days to help you figure out what kind of depression you might have.

If you think you have situational depression, read on.

#2 – Do things that make you feel good.

If you’re feeling depressed all of the time, our inclination is to collapse into our life. We stay in bed, we don’t shower or eat well and cut off contact with those we love.

Let me tell you: if you are feeling depressed, collapsing is absolutely the worst thing that you can do. Instead, it is important to do things that make you feel good.

For me, I keep a list of things to do when I am feeling depressed. First off: take a long, hard walk (the endorphins are great for my depression). Also, do yoga. Watch The Walking Dead. Take a bath. Go to the movies. Have sex. Eat Pad Thai. When I am depressed I do one, or all, of those things and my depression is often lifted.

So, what makes you happy? Write out a list, when you aren’t depressed, of what makes you happy so that when you are depressed you are ready.

#3 – Keep your mind active.

Unfortunately, when you’re feeling depressed, our worst enemy is that brain of ours.

While we are lying on the couch feeling sorry for ourselves, our brain is actively buying into it all.

You are a loser, it says. You have no friends. You aren’t good at anything. You will never find love.  You suck at your job. And on and on.

And, chances are, that none of those things are true. That you are not a loser, you have plenty of friends, you are talented, love is out there and your boss thinks you are doing great. But your brain, when you are depressed, just doesn’t go there.

It is really important when you’re feeling depressed, to keep your brain busy.  Yoga is a really good way to do this – you are so busy trying to figure out the damn pose that you don’t have a chance to think about anything. It also has the side benefit of toning your body and making you feel strong, which can be helpful.

Other options for keeping your mind quiet are reading, going to a movie, hanging out with friends, working. Meditation is also an option but I just get more depressed when I try and fail, to meditate. If you can do it, go for it!

What do you like to do that will help you quiet that mind of yours, the mind that is feeding into those feelings that are bringing you down? Figure it out and do it!

#4 – Choose your playmates carefully.

One of the most important things to manage when you’re feeling depressed is your environment. Your bed and your pjs might feel like the right thing to do but you know now they are not.

    Silence Tells

    Silence tells

    Silence also tells!!
    When innocent eye yells.
    Whatever you trying to hide,
    Will keep you dying deep inside.
    Don’t feel depressed,
    You are not weak.
    Let the self-belief,
    Guide you in whatever you seek.

    -Anand Singh

      How do I Know if I am Bored or Depressed

      How do I Know if I am Bored or Depressed

      Whether it’s yawning through a boring lecture, being part of a dull conversation, mindlessly switching TV channels or even waking up one day and just feeling “blah” – we have all felt boredom and despised that feeling.

      Often looked upon as an unpleasant feeling, boredom is characterized by lack of interest. It makes you restless and fills you with all sorts of emotions ranging from frustration to guilt and sadness.

      Regardless of how ‘busy’ you might be, you can still be horribly bored, owing to your lack of motivation towards work, college or life in general.

       

      How to Keep Boredom at Bay?

      As per a study published in ‘Motivation and Emotion’, there are five types of boredom – indifferent, calibrating, searching, reactant and apathetic.

      If not addressed, it can get destructive and become a larger issue. Here are four effective ways to conquer boredom –

      1. Identify the underlying issue

      When you’re bored, you can shrug it off and continue to feel that way or you can dig deeper and identify the root cause of your boredom.

      In most cases, boredom is just masking the real, underlying issue. From a task or job not being stimulating enough and fearing the outcome to lacking motivation and energy – there can be many reasons why you might be bored.

      So, the next time you’re in this situation, find out what’s really pulling you down and work towards overcoming it.

       

      2. Learn a new skill

      Sometimes we get so caught up in the monotony of life that all we need is a little excitement. A great way to get some mental stimulation is by learning something new.

      You can take up a new hobby, join a class, learn a new skill or do something that excites you. This keeps you engaged, and you are able to look forward to something

       

      3. Find your life purpose

      Finding your life purpose is the key to being content. By finding the larger purpose and aligning your goals to it, you are able to lead a more meaningful life.

      “What does that have to do with boredom,” you ask?

      Boredom arises from emptiness and when you lead a purposeful life, there is no place for boredom because you are focused on chasing the bigger things – the stuff that matters challenges you and brings you joy.

       

      4. Be physically active

      Exercising and being physically active is not just about losing weight and being fit. It’s got multiple mental health benefits too. Being physically active help relives stress, fights anxiety and also boosts your mood.

      So, make exercise a part of your daily routine and you are sure to see a spike in your energy and productivity levels.

       

      When does Boredom Turn into Depression?

      You often find yourself zoning out in work meetings – does that mean you’re bored?

      “How do I know if I am bored or depressed” has got to be one of the most common questions people have in this aspect and it’s a valid concern to have owing how similar their symptoms seem.

      In spite of there being an overlap, being bored does not necessarily mean you’re depressed.

      Depression is when one is in a constant state of unhappiness. There might also be instances when one might find it difficult to put a finger on the exact reason.

       

      5 Things To Do If You Feel Depressed Even When Nothing’s Wrong

      5 Things To Do If You Feel Depressed Even When Nothing's Wrong

      Have you been asking yourself Why do I feel depressed because, really, my life is great?

      Do you feel like you have everything that you want in your life but still you feel like you are carrying a hundred pound weight on your back, that you have no interest in anything and that all you want to do is sleep?

      I am not a doctor but I can tell you that I used to feel that way all the time. I lived with this overwhelming sense of hopelessness and dread. I tried to be a good parent but keeping my energy up was close to impossible. I tried to be great wife but my irritability prevented that from happening. I had a great job but my performance suffered.

      This went on for years. YEARS. I thought that I was managing it, and I was. Until I wasn’t.

      One day, when I was 42 years old, I found myself in a closet banging my head against the wall. I had no idea what was going on.

      A friend of mine scooped me up off the floor and took me to see a psychiatrist. He diagnosed me with chemical depression. He sent me off with some medication and instructions to follow up with a therapist.

      That day changed my life.

      I learned that chemical depression is a disease caused by a chemical imbalance. The same as heart disease, the same as thyroid disease. The way I was feeling was not because of some personal weakness but because my brain chemistry was letting me down. And that, treated, I was going to start enjoying my great life!

      If you are feeling depressed but nothing is wrong in your life then you too could be chemical depressed. This means that you have a chemical imbalance that causes depressive symptoms without something actually being wrong.

      So, what do you do if you are feeling depressed but nothing is wrong? I have some suggestions.

      #1 – Ask yourself a few questions.

      A good way to get a sense of whether or not you are chemical depressed is to ask yourself some questions. They are:

      • Are you living with feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness or hopelessness
      • Are you more irritable than usual?
      • Have you lost interest in things that used to make you happy?
      • Are you not sleeping as well as you used to?
      • Have your sleep patterns changed? Are you spending more time in bed?
      • Have your eating patterns changed? Have you lost or gained weight?
      • Are you more anxious than you used to be?
      • Do you struggle with feelings of worthlessness?
      • Do you have a hard time focusing?
      • Do you think about committing suicide?
      • Do you have new physical problems, like headaches or backaches.

      If you answered yes to any, or all, of these questions you are most likely suffering from chemical depression.

      Now, ask yourself if this has happened to your before? How regularly? Does anyone else in your family struggle with depression? Were there any traumatic experiences in your life that might have affected your deeply?

      If you answer YES to any of those questions you most likely suffer from chemical depression.

      What to do next?

       

      #2 – Don’t be embarrassed.

      Many people who are diagnosed with chemical depression are embarrassed. Embarrassed that they can’t just “suck it up.” That they might have some kind of personal deficiency that makes them weak in the face of this perceived disease.

      Let me tell you! You are not weak. You are not lacking something that others have that make it so that you can ‘suck it up.’ You are actually incredibly brave for facing this issue head on.

      Again, chemical depression is a disease caused by a chemical imbalance. The same as heart disease, the same as thyroid disease.

      Chemical depression is perceived by many in society to be a personal weakness. I mean how can you be depressed if nothing is wrong? Luckily more and more people are speaking up about living with mental illness. More and more people, including many famous people, are being honest about living well with their condition and helping to eliminate the stigma about mental illness.

      So, join the celebrities. Don’t be embarrassed. Chemical depression is not something that you could have prevented. But it is something that you can deal with.

       

      #3 – See your primary care doctor immediately.

      If you are feeling depressed but your life is great it is important that you reach out to your primary care doctor as soon as possible to tell her about your symptoms. Seeking medical help is key to dealing with depression.

      Many primary care physicians are knowledgeable about the treatment of depression and can help you with treatment right away. Some primary care doctors might refer you to a psychiatrist who can help you diagnose and manage your depression.

      Either way, see you doctor right away.

      What To Do When You’re Feeling Depressed, Isolated And Lost

      What To Do When You're Feeling Depressed, Isolated And Lost

      Has your life gotten to that place where you are feeling depressed, isolated and lost all the time?

      Are you feeling hopeless, alone and full of dread and worried about what the future will hold?

      If you are, I am so sorry. Being depressed and feeling alone is a horrible place to be!

      Fortunately, there are things you can do to stop feeling depressed, isolated and lost all the time.

      #1 – Figure out the why.

      There are two kinds of depression, situational and chemical. They have similar symptoms but different causes. Knowing what kind of depression you have is the first step to dealing with it.

      Situational depression is caused by something that happens in your life. When something big happens that makes you sad, like the death of a parent or a divorce or the loss of a job, you can become situationally depressed. This kind of depression usually has a beginning, caused by a specific event, and an end, and is often treated differently from chemical depression.

      Chemical depression is the result your brain chemistry being off in such a way that leads to depression. You are most often born with chemical depression but it can also by caused by a traumatic life event.

      Chemical depression can happen to you even if your life is going great.

      So, ask yourself some questions about what your life looks like these days to help you figure out what kind of depression you might have.

      If you think you have situational depression, read on. If you think you have chemical depression here is an article for you to read to learn more about next steps.

       

      #2 – Do what makes you feel good.

      When we are feeling depressed, isolated and lost, our inclination is to collapse into our life. We stay in bed, we don’t shower or eat well and cut off contact with those we love.

      Let me tell you: if you are feeling depressed, collapsing is absolutely the worst thing that you can do. Instead, it is important to do things that make you feel good.

      For me, I keep a list of things to do when I am feeling depressed. 1. Take a long, hard walk (the endorphins are great for my depression). 2. Do yoga. 3. Watch The Walking Dead. 4. Take a bath. 5. Go to the movies. 6. Have sex. 7. Eat Pad Thai. When I am depressed I do one, or all, of those things and my depression is often lifted.

      So, what makes you happy? Write out a list, when you aren’t depressed, of what makes you happy so that when you are depressed you are ready.

       

      #3 – Occupy your mind.

      Unfortunately, when we are feeling depressed, isolated and lost, our worst enemy is that brain of ours.

      While we are lying on the couch feeling sorry for ourselves, our brain is actively buying into it all.

      You are a loser, it says. You have no friends. You aren’t good at anything. You will never find love.  You suck at your job. And on and on.

      And, chances are, that none of those things are true. That you are not a loser, you have plenty of friends, you are talented, love is out there and your boss thinks you are doing great. But your brain, when you are depressed, just doesn’t go there.

      It is really important, when you are feeling depressed and isolated, to keep your brain busy.  Yoga is a really good way to do this – you are so busy trying to figure out the damn pose that you don’t have a chance to think about anything. It also has the side benefit of toning your body and making you feel strong, which can be helpful.

      Other options for keeping your mind quiet are: reading, going to a movie, hanging out with friends, working. Meditation is also an option but I just get more depressed when I try, and fail, to meditate. If you can do it, go for it!

      What do you like to do that will help you quiet that mind of yours, the mind that is feeding into those feelings that are bringing you down? Figure it out and do it!

      What to Say When You Are Depressed And Someone Asks How You Are

      What to Say When You Are Depressed And Someone Asks How You Are

      You know that moment when you are depressed and you are out in the world because you have to be, even if you’d rather be at home under the covers, that moment when someone, known or unknown, asks how you are?

      And you think yourself : Well, how the hell do I answer that question?

      The answer to that question is not a clear one but there are different ways to answer, depending on what you feel like you can handle and what you need. The goal when we are feeling depressed is to make sure that we are doing and asking for what WE need, not trying to please other people who might be pushing us to let them help us.

      So, if someone asks you how you are, let your answer reflect what you need in the moment.

      Here are a few suggestions:

      #1 – I’m fine.

      Just because someone asks you how you are, that doesn’t mean you need to spill your guts to them. Feeling anything other than fine is not something that you have to share with someone you don’t feel comfortable sharing with.

      For me, when I’m depressed and my mother calls to ask how I am, I always say I’m fine. I just don’t want to get into it with her. I know that having a conversation with my mother about my depression will be all about her trying to talk me out of it. And that is never helpful.

      In other words, it’s okay to not always be honest about how you’re feeling. It is important, however, that if you’re not going to be honest, you are then willing to ‘walk the walk’ of feeling fine for as long as you’re with that person. Telling my mother that I am fine and then sulking around the house is just a lose-lose situation for both of us.

       

      #2 – I’m really struggling.

      Should you choose to be honest about your feelings then I would suggest being as simple and straightforward as you can. Telling someone that you’re really struggling, with or without a reason why, might be exactly what you need to say.

      For many of us, just having someone acknowledge how we feel in the moment can help us alleviate our bad feelings. I think this is especially the case with our men. I know that if my man asks me how I am and I admit to him that I am feeling sad and he acknowledges it, without trying to fix it, I always feel just a little bit better.

      I also know that if I tell them I’m fine, and I’m not, everything gets way worse, fast.

      So, even if you don’t feel like getting into it, telling someone you’re struggling might be just what you need in the moment.

       

      #3 – I am depressed.

      Admitting that you are depressed might be the answer that works for you. Talking to someone about your depression might be exactly what you need.

      But remember, by sharing what is going on, you might be inviting the other person to feel like they need to fix you.

      For many people, when faced with somebody who is struggling, they want to fix them right away, to make them feel better. Nobody likes to see anybody suffer and we feel like if we can help someone, we will all feel better.

      So, be prepared to talk about what’s wrong if you share with someone what’s going on. That person might try, and fail, to help you and that just might put you in a worse place. But, at the same time, they could say exactly what you need to hear. It’s a bit of a risk, sharing deeply, but the rewards can be substantial.

      Signs It’s Not Your Body But Your Soul That’s Tired

      Signs It's Not Your Body But Your Soul That's Tired

      Have you been feeling completely exhausted and burnt out lately?

      Have you been trying different solutions for physical and mental exhaustion but none of the solutions are working?

      It may be because sometimes our struggles are not just physical or mental in nature. Sometimes it’s not just our body or mind but our soul that’s tired.

      “Soul exhaustion” or “Soul sickness” can happen if we have been ignoring the cries of our soul for a long time and not paying proper attention towards our spiritual well being.

      One of the most prominent signs of soul exhaustion is the desire to sleep longer than normal and inability to carry out even basic functions like eating or exercising on time.
      If we do not pay attention to these warning signals in the initial stages, it may lead to severe long-term health issues such as chronic anxiety or severe depression.

      When our soul is exhausted, we may also feel heightened sensitivity and irritability and experience a constant feeling on living on the edge.

      If we continue to live like this without taking the time to tend to our soul, we will undergo an emotional breakdown sooner or later.

      Here are some of the most common signs and symptoms of soul exhaustion to watch out for:

      1) We experience unexplained pains and aches.

      Our mind, body, and soul are connected. If there is any imbalance in the one, it will affect the other. Therefore, if our soul or heart is tired, it may try to grab our attention by creating physical disturbances in our body.

      We may feel unexplained pains and aches, dizziness, nausea, migraine or tension headaches, blurred vision or gastrointestinal issues without any medical reasons.

       

      2) We experience anxiety or panic attacks.

      When the soul is exhausted, we may find it difficult to find peace and the world may look all dark and confusing.

      We may try various means of cheering us up by trying the things that used to give us joy earlier but none of these works now and this may lead to a sense of dread and hopelessness causing anxiety or panic attacks.

       

      3) Difficulty in coping up with challenges and struggles that come our way.

      Ups and downs are a part of life and we are generally equipped to deal with them but when our soul is feeling weary we may not even have the strength to cope up with simple challenges or difficulties that life throws our way.

      It is very important to take a step back and take some time out to cater to our spiritual wellbeing whether by going for yoga, meditation, silence or spiritual retreats to gain the energy to cope up with life’s challenges.

       

      4) We suffer from insomnia.

      If we are not in a happy and peaceful state, it will become next to impossible to get a good night’s sleep. Even if we manage to sleep a couple of hours, it will be filled with anxious thoughts or nightmares and we will wake up feeling tired and exhausted.
      And then we go through the entire day like a zombie, unable to give our attention to any task at hand.

       

      5) We experience negative emotions like bitterness, anger, resentment or jealousy.

      All of us feel negative emotions sometimes but when our body and mind is not in alignment with our soul, we will experience negative emotions like bitterness, anger, resentment or jealousy more frequently and vehemently.
      If we are feeling more negative emotions like anger, jealousy or bitterness recently whereas we were able to feel love, compassion, and joy earlier, it could be because our soul is weary and asking for our attention.

       

      6) We may feel extremely lonely even while we are surrounded by people.

      When we are out of sync with our soul, we may feel extremely lonely even while surrounded by people. We may feel like no one understands we and we may not be able to trust people around us.

      We may face an existential crisis and question the deeper meaning of life and how we are interconnected to each other. These are few questions that can be answered in solitude and therefore we have an overwhelming desire of being on our own than being in crowds.

      How to Cope with Feeling Depressed When Going Through A Divorce

      How to Cope with Feeling Depressed When Going Through A Divorce

      Are you going through a divorce and wondering if you will ever stop feeling depressed, so overwhelmed by everything that is going on?

      Divorce is hell – everything that was familiar in your life is changing and it is devastating. Keeping your spirits up for the kids, trying to focus on work and wondering what the hell you are going to cook for dinner just feels like more than you can bear some days.

      I get it. I have been there.

      But I am also here to tell you that you can and will get through your divorce even if you are feeling depressed. Let me help!

      #1 – Nest.

      When I was going through a divorce, I met a woman who had been through one the previous year. Because I had never gone through a divorce before, I had no idea how to cope. Lucky for me, she was able to help because she had been just been through it.

      I had moved out of our family home and had found a rental.  I had left my things at our house so that it would look good when we tried to sell it. My new friend told me, in no uncertain terms, that I had to get my things and bring them to my new house.

      For women, when we are going through a hard time, our surroundings are very important. It has something to do with the nesting instinct that is very primal. Women want their space to be a comforting, happy place. 

      So, what did I do? I had my things moved to my rental and I filled our family home with furniture from a house staging company. And did it make a difference? Oh yes, it did. Being surrounded by my furniture, by my pictures, sleeping in my bed with my bed linens, seeing the little things that I had accumulated over the years on the shelves all gave me such a sense of comfort.  My life was so confusing because of all the change but coming home to my things provided me more comfort than I can even explain.

      #2 – Get support.

      For many women, going through divorce is very embarrassing. It feels like failure on so many levels. And because it is so, we often try to go with alone. We think we can tough it out and get through it and that we will be just fine.

      But the reality is is that we all need support when we go through this very difficult period. We have never been divorced before and we have no idea what we’re doing and it’s very important that we align ourselves with people who are informed and supportive.

      What kind of people? For me, my friend who had been through a divorce was a huge source of information and support. She could look back on her divorce and talk to me about her successes and her failures so as I went through my divorce process I knew what to look out for.

      I also found myself a therapist who I talked to every week. I really felt like I was the biggest loser on the planet because my husband decided he didn’t want be with me anymore and she was incredibly helpful, pointing out that divorces don’t happen because one person didn’t do something right but that there are two people in marriage and both share responsibility for the good and the bad.

      Someone else who really helped me when I was going through my divorce was my massage therapist. My husband left me right after my youngest child went off to school so I was left completely alone. For the first time in 18 years, I wasn’t being touched regularly. So, I indulged and got a massage once a week for three months. Having somebody touch me for 60 minutes a week significantly help me get through these very turbulent times.

      And, finally, I got myself a lawyer. She was able to walk me through the reality of getting a divorce and what being divorced would look like. And how much it would cost. Information for me is very powerful. It makes me feel like I have some control of my outcome. Talking to her gave me the clarity I needed to be able to move forward confidently.

      #3 – Make a plan for the future.

      After talking to my lawyer, I realized that, for the rest of my life, I was going to have to take care of myself. I was scared out of my mind.

      I had been mostly a stay-at-home mom for 20 years and all of a sudden I was going to be responsible for taking care of myself financially, for doing my own taxes, for finding healthcare and for figuring out how to fix things that broke in my house. I was very overwhelmed and didn’t know how I was going to handle it.

      So I started to think about where I wanted to live, what I wanted my life to look like, what I wanted to do now that I was on my own. I realized that, while being alone was scary, it was also give me a certain amount of freedom. For the first time in 20 years, I could live the way I wanted to live. Realizing that really helped me cope with feeling depressed because for 20 years I had been unhappy and I knew that now I was in charge of fixing my unhappiness.

      Next, I made plan. I came up with a list of things that I was going to need to consider for my future and I came up with a list of people who could support me when I needed support. I found myself a financial planner. I found myself a CPA to help me with my taxes. I found myself a handyman who could help me with those things around the house that I couldn’t take care of myself.

      Lastly, I did the math. I figured out what my expenses were so I knew what kind of money I was going to need going forward to survive. Armed with that knowledge, I was able to secure the kind of alimony that I would need to get myself back on my feet.

      Making a plan, having an idea of what my future looked like and how I was going manage, really helped me to cope with my feeling depressed while going through my divorce.

      What It Means When You Wake Up Feeling Depressed For No Reason

      What It Means When You Wake Up Feeling Depressed For No Reason

      Was it that kind of morning for you? Did you wake up feeling depressed for no reason AGAIN? Is this becoming a pattern and are you wondering why?

      Is your life going along pretty great? Are you happy with your relationships, your job, your health? And yet, for some reason, you are still feeling depressed?

      If the answer is yes, then there are a few things that you can do to try and figure out what is going on.

      Getting past depression is important and knowing the cause is an important part of doing so.

       

      #1 – Take note of the view out your window.

      What time of year is it when you are reading this article? Summer? Winter? Fall? Spring. Believe it or not, the time of year can greatly affect your moods, maybe even contribute to why you wake up feeling depressed for no reason.

      Seasonal Affective Disorder is a depressive disorder caused by the change of seasons. Some people get depressed because of the reduced daylight hours. Some people because of the temperature changes. Everyone affected by SAD finds themselves sad without something being wrong.

      Fall is a hard time for me because my kids go back to school and the days start getting shorter. If I don’t pay attention I often find myself deeply depressed, even if everything else is great.

      How do you deal with SAD? The most effective way is with a full spectrum lamp. The lamp will help your body tolerate the change in seasons by exposing it to full spectrum light.

      Another thing to ask yourself is if something painful happened to you this same time of year in another year. I know that every year in early June I get very depressed because it is the anniversary of my mother’s death. Sometimes it creeps up on me and I don’t even know it.

      Anticipating anniversaries that might be fraught with emotion is a good way to keep the SAD at bay because you can take steps to deal with what might make you sad. I make sure I do something that reminds me of my mom before the anniversary of her death and it has really helped me manage the pain of the loss so that it doesn’t bring me down.

       

      #2 – Get your thyroid and Vitamin D levels checked.

      Two major causes of depression can be thyroid hormone levels that are off and low vitamin D.

      When our thyroid hormone levels are off a variety of symptoms can arise. One of them is depression. Many of my clients who come to me complaining of depressive feelings often end up having thyroid disorders.

      Vitamin D deficiency is also one of the major causes of depression. Because of the prevalence of sunscreen use, and a significant shortage of sunshine during some parts of the year, many Americans don’t get enough sun. The sun is the only way for a human being to get Vitamin D (other than fortified milk and orange juice) so sun deficiency means a Vitamin D deficiency and Vitamin D deficiency leads to depression.

      Fortunately, in both cases, testing is easy – a simple blood test – and treatment involves taking a pill.

      So, if you’re suddenly feeling depressed for no reason call your primary care doctor and get your blood checked right away.

       

      #3 – Make sure you are taking good care of yourself.

      Are you eating well? Getting exercise? Spending time with friends? Taking care of your hygiene?

      If not, this could be the cause of your depression.

      Taking care of our mental and physical bodies is a key to mental and physical health. If you don’t take care of yourself, but instead live on wine and ice cream, eventually your body is going to react.

      A body that isn’t well fed or exercised will start to turn on itself, causing all sort of debilitating issues. One of those issues is depression.

      So, if you find that you’re suddenly feeling depressed for no reason, examine how you are taking care of yourself. If you are not doing a good job try to make a change. You might find your depression lifts if you do.