Freeing Yourself of the Lifelong Sadness You’ve Felt as a Sensitive Person

Freeing Yourself of the Lifelong Sadness You’ve Felt as a Sensitive Person

Free yourself of lifelong sadness as a sensitive person.

Today’s question is from Samantha in England. She asks:

How can I free myself from the deep sadness that I feel and have felt since I was a child?

She goes on to explain:

I have been told it’s depression that I’m suffering from and that it runs in the family. I’ve always felt like an outsider in life … like I live in a bubble. I’ve found out that I’m an empath and a Highly Sensitive Person. I have also suffered from chronic headaches and migraines since I was a child. I just feel like I don’t belong in this life.

Freeing Yourself of the Lifelong Sadness You’ve Felt as a Sensitive Person

In my time working with others and working on myself, I’ve learned that sensitive people – particularly emphatic and highly sensitive types – are more prone to emotional issues such as depression and anxiety because of the way they’re wired. I’ve personally experienced depression and anxiety frequently throughout my life and I have always found the root cause to lie in my finely sharpened senses which cringe at the slightest touch, sight, smell or taste and my highly sensitive emotional tuning which leaves me feeling delicate, high-strung and on-edge all the time.

The blessing and curse of being a sensitive person are that we can feel the world deeply, and while that includes feeling its immense beauty, magic, and love (the blessing), it also includes feeling the world’s darkness, cruelty and insanity (the curse). When we become too consumed on one side of the spectrum of life we suffer terribly. Without experiencing the beauty of life, we experience only darkness, and without experiencing the darkness of life, we experience a fabricated lie that leaves us unconsciously uneasy and neurotic.

Read 25 Signs You’re A Highly Sensitive Person

Where Does Deep Sadness Come From?

Deep sadness occurs in a person’s life for many reasons, ranging from tragedy to trauma, to chemical imbalance. But for the sensitive person, deep sadness is usually existential; in other words, it involves mourning the self and its relation to life, and life and its relation to the self.

It’s not uncommon for this deep sadness to begin awakening in childhood as the self begins to develop from a young age and starts to perceive itself as “separate” from others. I call this the fundamental core wound as it is at the very core of all our suffering in life. I will expand on this a bit later.

When we see ourselves as separate from everything, as isolated little islands that are different or somehow unequal to others, we begin developing emotional and psychological complexes. We start thinking thoughts such as, “I’m so different,” “I’m so weak,” “I wish I could belong somewhere,” “I wish I could feel at home,” “The world has nothing to offer me.” All of these feelings and beliefs stem from the unconscious realization that something is not right here and somehow we have been sucked into this “wrongness” that is inherent in all that we see.

This inherent wrongness, this primal anti-truth that is expressed everywhere we look can be seen in the words, looks, actions, desires, dogmas, perceptions, and beliefs of everyone around us – including ourselves. As sensitive people we are finely tuned to the tension that always exists between us and “others”: the jealousy, the betrayal, the insecurity, the hatred, the pretension, as well as the B tension between us and the environment: the abuse, the greed, the destruction – and finally the tension that always exists within us: the self-sabotage, the shame, the fear, the isolation, the hunger for something “more” kept under a happy, socially approved guise.

The more sensitive we are at the end of the day, the more susceptible we are to seeing through the grand ploy, the great fraudulence of life that makes us feel incomplete and unfulfilled.

But this sensitivity is a great intelligence – and in fact, I would say it is the greatest kind of intelligence there is.

Read 20 Things You Do Differently Because You’re A Highly Sensitive Person

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