8 Inspirational TED Talks For Parents

Inspirational TED Talks For Parents

There are stages that were created with the interest of spreading the best possible ideas that have come to the mind of the best and biggest possible audience there is on the planet. The TED Talk stage is one of them. TED is created to stimulate spreading ideas, and they actually work under the slogan “Ideas Worth Spreading”.

The speaker allows you to take a journey by explaining the truth about what he is passionate about. Many online viewers of TED talks have expressed inspiration upon watching these awesome talks, including me. When I became a mom I was trying to gather every knowledge of parenting by watching these talks. 

Parenting can be overwhelming. There are many times you will find yourself wanting honest, experienced advice for this difficult phase. Ted Talks for parenting here came as a real rescue for me. It provided me with fresh ideas and inspiration that made my parenting journey a lot easier. Since there are so many Ted Talks, I have summarized some of the best talks about children and parenting.

Take a look at these 8 TED Talks that will inspire, move, and motivate you as a parent with well-thought and genuine advice.

1. Julie Lythcott-Haims: How to Raise Successful Kids Without Over-Parenting

Ted Tallks
8 Inspirational TED Talks For Parents

In this TED Talk, Lythcott-Haims, a former dean of freshman at Stanford University, is the author of “How to Raise an Adult,” gave us an insight that today’s parents care too much about their kid’s short-term happiness, rather than their long-term maturity. She explains, kids need us to be a little less obsessed with grades and scores and a whole lot more interested in childhood providing a foundation for their success built on things like love and chores.

She explains that constantly having high expectations of children forces you to over-parent and your child will never develop their own self-efficacy.

Check out the video here: How to Raise Successful Kids Without Over-Parenting

Read 19 Growth Mindset Ted Talks For Kids


2. TED Talk by Rita Pierson: Every Kid Needs A Champion

Explaining the calling of being a teacher, Pierson says:

Every child deserves a champion – an adult who will never give up on them, who understands the power of connection, and insists that they become the best that they can possibly be.

As a professional educator, she empathizes on the importance of believing in students and the importance of connecting with the students as a friend rather than a teacher to help them succeed. She reminds the educators to focus on building genuine relationships with students in order to make the students believe in their own capabilities to achieve success.

Check out the video here: Every Kid Needs A Champion


3. TED Talk by Shane Koyczan: To this day…For the bullied and beautiful

Every action in childhood leaves a profound memory, be it love or hate, and in this talk, bullying. Shane Koyczan, a Canadian poet and a spoken word artist from Penticton, talks about how children are pressured and aims to highlight the deep and long-term impact of bullying in this talk. Koyczan shared his own story and his own pain. He insists on not brushing off bullying as a minor issue but also hopes for the kids to see beauty in being who they are.

He says “If you don’t think you’re beautiful, find a better mirror”. He motivates individuals to be who they are and to not let other people define who they want to be.

Check out the video here: To This Day…For The Bullied And Beautiful


4. TED Talk by Jennifer Senior: For Parents, Happiness Is A Very High Bar

As I said earlier, parenting can be overwhelming. But here Writer and All Joy and No Fun author Jennifer Senior call it “a giant, candy-colored monument to our collective panic”. How every parent is focused on achieving happiness for their children and how that aim only is one that causes stress more than anything else.

Jennifer insists parents focus on building achievable aims for their children. Instead of finding happiness for them, she told the parents to guide them for morals and ethics, which will allow children to find happiness in this world for themselves. 

She urges; “In our desperate quest to create happy kids, we may be assuming the wrong moral burden. It strikes me as a better goal–and, dare I say, a more virtuous one–to focus on making productive kids and moral kids.”. J

Check out the video here: For Parents, Happiness Is A Very High Bar

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