The 8 Faces of Depression: Identifying the Types and Symptoms of Depression

Symptoms may include nightmares, anxiety or panic triggered by events that trigger the traumatic memory.

It can be cured by talk therapy, antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications.

 

7). Substance-Induced Mood Disorder (SIMD)

SIMD is caused due to substance abuse. Certain drugs have the potential to gravely affect your mental health. The adverse effects of these drugs can result in manic or chronic depression.

Rehab, medications and talk therapy can help all cure SIMD.

8) Psychotic Disorder

People with psychotic depression suffer from severe depression along with “psychotic” symptoms, such as:

  • Hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there)
  • Delusions (false beliefs)
  • Paranoia (wrongly believing that others are trying to harm you)

It can be treated by a combination of talk therapy, antidepressants, and antipsychotic drugs.

 

If you notice any of these symptoms being experienced by any of your friends, family members or closed ones, please reach out to them.

They may not even know they are suffering from depression or may not reach out due to feelings of guilt or shame or hopelessness.

 

“Express empathy for the person and offer to help them get connected to people that can help them with how they are feeling. Help them develop a plan to get help and follow-through with them until they get connected. People often don’t know they are depressed or what’s wrong with them and may need your help getting connected to the appropriate healthcare people that can treat their condition.”
– Kevin Gilliland  (Psy.D.), the clinical psychologist at Innovation 360, Dallas.

 

The passage below was taken from this helpful article by Captain Awkward (Jennifer Peepas): 

I think one thing you can do to help your friends who are depressed is to reach out to them not in the spirit of helping, but in the spirit of liking them and wanting their company. “I’m here to help if you ever need me” is good to know, but hard to act on, especially when you’re in a dark place. Specific, ongoing, pleasure-based invitations are much easier to absorb. “I’m here. Let’s go to the movies. Or stay in and order takeout and watch some dumb TV.” “I’m having a party, it would be really great if you could come for a little while.” Ask them for help with things you know they are good at and like doing, so there is reciprocity and a way for them to contribute. “Will you come over Sunday and help me clear my closet of unfashionable and unflattering items? I trust your eye.” “Will you read this story I wrote and help me fix the dialogue?” “Want to make dinner together? You chop, I’ll assemble.” “I am going glasses shopping and I need another set of eyes.” Remind yourself why you like this person, and in the process, remind them that they are likable and worth your time and interest.

Talk to the parts of the person that aren’t being eaten by the depression. Make it as easy as possible to make and keep plans, if you have the emotional resources to be the initiator and to meet your friends a little more than halfway. If the person turns down a bunch of invitations in a row because (presumably) they don’t have the energy to be social, respect their autonomy by giving it a month or two and then try again. Keep the invitations simple; “Any chance we could have breakfast Saturday?” > “ARE YOU AVOIDING ME BECAUSE YOU’RE DEPRESSED OR BECAUSE YOU HATE ME I AM ONLY TRYING TO HELP YOU.” “I miss you and I want to see you” > “I’m worried about you.” A depressed person is going to have a shame spiral about how their shame is making them avoid you and how that’s giving them more shame, which is making them avoid you no matter what you do. No need for you to call attention to it. Just keep asking. “I want to see you” “Let’s do this thing.” “If you are feeling low, I understand, and I don’t want to impose on you, but I miss your face. Please come have coffee with me.” “Apology accepted. ApologIES accepted. So. Gelato and Outlander?”

Time, attention, love, enjoyment > help.

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Shweta Advanihttps://writershwetaadvani.wordpress.com/
An HR consultant by profession, a slam poet and freelance writer.Avid reader,dancer and yoga enthusiast. When I am not reading or writing, I star gaze or take long walks in nature.
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