Introverts and Withdrawal: Why We Do It

🖋 Brenda Knowles
April 28, 2016

We are navigating change or the unknown. If there is a lot of change going on in our lives, we may hole up for a while in order to sort through what is going on and prepare ourselves for new situations. Introverts like to be prepared. Prior knowledge soothes our sensitive systems. We require space to mentally work through the process of meeting new people, navigating unfamiliar places and surviving different experiences. At first, new situations will feel overwhelming, possibly driving us underground to recharge and sift through all the foreign material filling our minds. But, as Emily White says in her article on QuietRev.com titled, Leave Your House, Change Your Life, newness is only overwhelming in the beginning. After a couple of sessions with a new situation, you will have information to draw from and a much better idea of what to expect.

It’s a challenge to retreat

As many of us already know, it is difficult to ask for and obtain time to re-charge. Almost everyone in your immediate circle will ask and expect you to keep on plugging on. They’ll expect you to get over
Although I didn’t get a real break last week, I did spend quality time with generous, positive, and inspiring friends this week. The emotional flooding is beginning to subside.whatever is bothering you and be there for them with a smile. The message being that self-care is selfish. The message being that work and others are always first. Introverts spend a fair amount of time feeling bad for needing a break.

I know there will be more healing space in my near future.

What needs to happen after the withdrawal?

I felt extra sensitive and tired last week. I was burned out when my marriage ended. Both times I wanted to fill myself up with swaths of uninterrupted time, positive support, meaningful work and expansive ideas. While it’s vital to take time for self-care, eventually space needs to lead to action. In my follow-up post next week, I will talk about why it is important to minimize withdrawal and re-join life.

What makes you want to withdraw? How does your need for space affect those you love? What gets you out of this mode?

If this post spoke to you in a meaningful way, please pass it on.

Thank you,

Brenda


Written by Brenda Knowles

Brenda Knowles is a personal coach who helps introverts gain confidence to be their true selves and enhance intimacy and understanding in their relationships. Learn more at BrendaKnowles.com.

This article has been republished from Brendaknowles.com, click here to view the original copy.

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Tags: alonealonenesshspinfjintrovertINTROVERTSpersonality
🖋 Brenda Knowles

Creator of space2live and brendaknowles.com. Introvert and highly sensitive person champion. Individual and relationship coach. Myers Briggs Practitioner. Lover of books, music and butterscotch.

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View Comments

  • First, because we need to recharge because our energy is drained and because if we are empaths, our being has become corrupted with other people's negative emotions and we need to detox ourselves and when we're around overwhelming places, people, we get overstimulated and we need to withdraw to sort out and analyze all of this new info. Don't even get me started on the smells and noises,.

  • excellent reading.. better to withdraw safely than retreat into a bottle or mind-numbing substance, ty

  • I am INTJ. We don't withdraw because we want to, we do it because we must in order to cleanse all our chakras. One can't help others by taking on their burdens of negative energy until all the previous days flotsam and jetsam is cleared away first to make room. The cup must be empty before it can be once more filled. This goes for both good and bad energy ... it is one and the same.

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