5 Step Guide To Help Parents Raise Creative Kids

Raising Creative Kids

4. Give them an example to follow.

Parents, our kids need to see that we’re more than just talk. We need to set an example of growth in our own skills and creative lives. Our actions, not our words, are what leave a lasting impression.

The skill I’m trying to develop now is drawing. Sometimes I draw a comic for my son so he has something fun in his lunchbox. I was shocked recently when he pulled out a stack of papers from his lunchbox. He had kept every one of them. I had no idea my little comics meant so much to him. It made me more committed than ever to continue doing this so that someday he’ll do something equally as meaningful with his kids.

I had no idea my little comics meant so much to him. It made me more committed than ever to continue doing this so that someday he’ll do something equally as meaningful with his kids.

Our actions, not our words, are what leave a lasting impression.

5. Give them tools and resources.

There are a lot of things we don’t automatically buy for our son. He doesn’t have the latest video game system, and he doesn’t have the fanciest bike. However, we have invested heavily in books and Legos—two types of items that have helped expand his creative mind. And I do consider these an investment, not an unnecessary expense.

(This isn’t to say that we go crazy with Legos, because they’re not cheap. We always buy them on sale. Most of my son’s Lego sets have been Christmas and birthday gifts from family members.)

We must be intentional about helping our kids explore their creative potential.

Parents, we must be intentional about helping our kids explore their creative potential. It doesn’t have to cost a lot of time or money. The most important thing is that they know we care about their creative development.

Related: 7 Tips to Raise A Self-Sufficient Child

No matter what type of learning tools your kids enjoy, it’s important to make room in our budgets if we’re able. This doesn’t always mean spending a lot of money, or maybe even none at all. Recently we made a 3D hologram for smartphones, and it didn’t cost a penny.

Through small steps over time, and by setting a positive example, we can help set up our kids for long-term success.

What are some ways you have helped your kids be more creative?


Written by Kent Sanders
Originally appeared on Kent Sanders
Raising Creative Kids
Raising creative kids

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