Teen Proofing Your Child: 11 Tips For Parents

Teen Proofing Your Child

2. Be supportive but not enabling.

When your child has fallen short in some way, it is helpful to provide support and perspective. When life has dealt them a cruel hand in some way, be the shoulder they can lean on, but don’t treat them as a victim.

Do this by reflecting confidence in their ability to bounce back, to overcome. Help them realize that they may be victimized by fate, or mistreated by friends they had trusted, but help them never lose sight that they are capable of overcoming those heartaches. Those that overcome hardships are victors, not victims.

Related: Why Are Teens So Lonely and 7 Things They Can Do To Combat Loneliness

3. Show your child that you have confidence in him/her.

Confidence is learned. Children learn confidence by seeing it reflected in their parents’ appraisal. (That is one of the reasons for letting children try and fail – it reflects confidence in the child’s ability to persist and eventually win the goal at which he or she had taken aim). Confidence is also learned through experience. Steer your child toward activities within which he or she can excel.

4. Put setbacks in perspective, they are not the end of the world.

When comforting your child in response to some setback in life, provide some perspective. This is not to say you should minimize the distress your child feels, but the events surrounding that hurt need to be realistically viewed. So you end up doing two things at once: comforting your child, and conveying the message “Toughen Up Buttercup.”

5. Place more emphasis on character than accomplishments (the effort put into getting a good grade is much more important than the grade itself).

Character trumps ability. Without character, ability is a hallow thing. A ship without a rudder. Your child’s persistence and effort are more important than the final outcome. The youngster who is naturally gifted and earns straight A’s, but puts forth little effort, is much less ready for adulthood than the child who earns straight B’s by putting forth consistent effort.

6. Build a relationship that welcomes your child’s ideas, even when those ideas conflict with your own.

Speak with interest and genuine regard about your child’s ideas, even if they appear foolish. You need not pretend that they are accurate. You should, however, try your best to help your child understand that you welcome the opportunity to understand his or her perspective. In this way, when your youngster is a teen, he or she is likely to feel more comfortable openly discussing various topics with you.

7. Teach your child how to choose friends wisely.

When children are young parents do best by helping them to choose their friends. These relationships will teach your child what to expect from peers as they grow older. They will also help to shape your child’s preference for the type of friendships formed later in life. When they are in their teens, these foundational friendships will act as guardrails to keep them on track. Badly chosen friendships will act as seductive invitations to behave in ways that have long-term consequences.

Related: 6 Ways Parents Can Communicate With Their Teenagers Better (According To Teens)

8. Teach your child that it is better to follow his/her judgement/moral compass than it is to win the approval of others.

Celebrate every instance of your child following his/her conscience. When faced with the enormous peer pressures of the adolescent crowd, conscience will be the ultimate bulwark against regrettable decisions. Spend time building that bulwark to be as strong as possible.

9. Teach self-control.

Performing household chores, not allowing temper tantrums in older children, developing good manners, sticking to routines even when it is difficult, are all ways in which children learn self-control. When confronted with the explosive cocktail of adolescent stress and hormones, self-control is a stalwart friend.

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