Six Kinds of Emotional Abuse by Narcissistic Parents

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4. Isolating

A parent who abuses a child through isolation may not allow the child to engage in appropriate activities with his or her peers; may keep a baby in his or her room, not exposed to stimulation or may prevent teenagers from participating in extracurricular activities. Requiring a child to stay in his or her room from the time school lets out until the next morning, restricting eating, or forcing a child to isolation or seclusion by keeping her away from family and friends can be destructive and considered emotional abuse depending on the circumstances and severity.

  • leaving a child unattended for long periods
  • keeping a child away from family
  • not allowing a child to have friends
  • not permitting a child to interact with other children
  • rewarding a child for withdrawing from social contact
  • ensuring that a child looks and acts differently than peers
  • isolating a child from peers or social groups
  • insisting on excessive studying and/or chores
  • preventing a child from participating in activities outside the home
  • punishing a child for engaging in normal social experiences

 

5. Corrupting

Parents who corrupt may permit children to use drugs or alcohol, watch cruel behavior toward animals, watch or look at inappropriate sexual content or to witness or participate in criminal activities such as stealing, assault, prostitution, gambling, etc.
Encouraging an underage child to do things that are illegal or harmful is abusive and should be reported.

  • rewarding child for bullying and/or harassing behavior
  • teaching racism and ethnic biases or bigotry
  • encouraging violence in sporting activities
  • inappropriate reinforcement of sexual activity
  • rewarding a child for lying and stealing
  • rewarding a child for substance abuse or sexual activity
  • supplying child with drugs, alcohol and other illegal substances
  • promoting illegal activities such as selling drugs

 

6. Exploiting

Exploitation can be considered manipulation or forced activity without regard for a child’s need for development. For instance, repeatedly asking an eight-year-old to be responsible for the family’s dinner is inappropriate. Giving a child responsibilities that are far greater than a child of that age can handle or using a child for profit is abusive.

  • infants and young children expected not to cry
  • anger when infant fails to meet a developmental stage
  • a child expected to be ‘caregiver’ to the parent
  • a child expected to take care of younger siblings
  • blaming a child for misbehavior of siblings
  • unreasonable responsibilities around the house
  • expecting a child to support family financially
  • encouraging participation in pornography
  • sexually abusing child or youth







Written by Lori Petro
P
rinted with permission
Originally appeared on – Teach Through Love.com



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