9 Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive In An Extroverted World

Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive

3. Model cooperative play with your children.

Sit down and play games like Candyland, Chutes, and Ladders, or card games. Review the social “rules” before initiating a game. Verbally praise your children when they demonstrate good social skills, like taking turns or complimenting each other. Redirect kids when they forget one of the “rules.”

Read 10 Signs Your Child is an Old Soul

Grade school (age 5-11)

Childhood marks a period of significant growth for children. Learning things like building friendships, problem-solving, collaboration, and social rules can be a challenge for some children, especially introverts. Recess and lunch can feel overwhelming for these children.

The following tips can help both parents and teachers support social and emotional learning in introverted children:

1. Teach introverted children how to ask for help…

In various situations, including requesting help from a teacher, asking a friend for help, and asking for help in a store.

2. Encourage creative problem-solving.

Model and practice ways to resolve sticky social situations with your children. Practice this often during the beginning of a new school year.

3. Review the expectations and routines at home regularly.

Review school expectations at the start of each new year. Establish consistent home-school communication and speak with the teacher about your child’s temperament early.

4. Help your introverted children find respite during the day.

Teach them about their need for calm moments, and teach them how to get it. Reading (at appropriate times), going to the library or visualizing their favorite place can all be ways for introverted children to carve out a few moments of peace during the day. Help your children figure out which methods work for them and teach them when they can use the skills during the school day.

5. Work with the teacher to establish “safe” zones at school—places children can go when they are feeling overwhelmed at lunch or recess.

These places can include the teacher’s room, the library or media center, or even the nurse’s office. Having a “safe” place can help your child learn to balance their need for solitude and recharge on harder days.

6. Teach your child about their introversion and what it means.

Ask them to describe what it “feels” like at the end of the day. Develop a routine around ways to renew. Have your introverted children write down the list and post it somewhere.

Read 25 Characteristics Of An Indigo Child

Introverted children have a lot to offer. Deep thinkers and highly creative, they can grow to become the influential innovators needed in today’s workforce. Building a strong foundation in which introverted children can flourish is a great way to help bring out the best in these quiet kids.


Written By Christine Fonseca
Originally Appeared In Psychology Today

If you have an introverted child, then keep in mind these pointers, and help them wholeheartedly in being themselves. Tell them that being introverted is not a bad thing, and being a little bit different is something they should be proud of. Parents can go a long way in helping their introverted children accept and love themselves.

Tips Help Introverted Children Thrive Pin
9 Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive In An Extroverted World
Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive in an extroverted world pin
Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive in an extroverted world
Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive pin
9 Tips to Help Introverted Children Thrive In An Extroverted World
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