How To Heal Your Most Debilitating Core Wounds

 April 28, 2019

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How To Heal Your Most Debilitating Core Wounds



I started working with coaches and therapists who had more embodied wisdom, and similar childhood trauma to me.In short, I started to reach out and ask for help for the first time ever. I truly surrendered.

Over the past year and a half I leaned harder into my self-development process than I ever have.

Largely catalyzed by a series of painful events (a significant breakup, a close friend passing away, and reaching a new level of success in my business and feeling deeply unfulfilled by it).

I started working with a transpersonal therapist, joined a weekly men’s group, and began doing more physically embodied therapeutic exercises that helped me get out of my head and into my emotional body.

Without hyperbole, this past year and a half has been the most challenging and healing period of time in my entire life, by a landslide.

Of all of the things that I have done, these are the three biggest things that I did to help heal my repressed pain and trauma.

It is my hope that you will be able to take something out of these steps to use in your own process.

1. Fully face, and accept, the truth of your situation

You can’t fully let go of something until you have first taken it into your hand and grasped it.If you don’t allow yourself to fully acknowledge the truth of whatever you have lived through, it will continue to have power over you.




There’s a big difference between saying

“I was bullied when I was young, but I was probably just being a sensitive little kid,” and, “I was bullied relentlessly for years and had suicidal thoughts for years because of it.”

There’s a big difference between saying

“I was raped when I was a teenager but I was probably asking for it because I was drunk and being flirtatious,” and, “I was raped when I was a teenager.

I know this because my sexual energy was violated and I found it difficult to get close to people for years. I still wake up from nightmares of my abuser breaking into my home.”

There’s a big difference between saying

“I might have been emotionally abused in my last marriage, but other people have had it so much worse than me,” and, “I was emotionally manipulated in my last marriage for so many years, to the point where I didn’t feel like I could trust my own mind in the slightest.

I still doubt myself constantly and never know if or when my emotions are appropriate in a given situation.” The point isn’t to be over-dramatic or to tell white lies.

The point is to be fully truthful. To own it fully. And that means allowing yourself to acknowledge the truth of the situation as you experienced it.

In practical terms, facing the full truth of your situation might look like writing out your full story on several pieces of paper or telling a close, trusted friend about your trauma or speaking to a coach or therapist for several sessions.

Whatever your truth is, it absolutely must be fully acknowledged and externalized before you can transcend it.




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