5 Things Sociopaths and Narcissists Say to Make You Feel Crazy

 January 18, 2016

5 Things Sociopaths and Narcissists Say to Make You Feel Crazy

5. “You’re crazy / bipolar / jealous / bitter / in love with me.”

The name-calling usually starts when things are going downhill fast. According to a psychopath, all of their ex lovers, colleagues, and friends are crazy, bipolar, jealous, bitter, or in love with them. This becomes very confusing when they start reaching out to those very same people they once denounced to you, using them to triangulate and cause chaos (making the psychopath appear in high-demand at all times). Then they toss you in that very same “crazy” bucket, continuing their never-ending cycle of idealizing and devaluing anyone unfortunate enough to cross their path.

 

The only way out is to go No Contact. This means no texts, calls, emails, or even Facebook friendships. Otherwise you can be guaranteed that they’ll do anything and everything in their power to make you feel crazy. The good news is, when a psychopath tries to make you doubt your intuition, it means your intuition was causing them trouble. Psychopaths seek to psychologically destroy anyone who might threaten their illusion of normalcy to the world. So when they begin playing mind games with you, it’s actually a strange indirect tribute to your ability to notice that something was “off” about them.


This article was originally published in forum thread: 5 Things Sociopaths and Narcissists Say to Make You Feel Crazy started by Peace

 

 
5 Things Sociopaths and Narcissists Say to Make You Feel Crazy

129 comments on “5 Things Sociopaths and Narcissists Say to Make You Feel Crazy

  1. Thank you, Jackson. Concise and covers it allpretty much all. That is personal topic to me, too. Took me 3 to 4 years to recover after such relationship. I would also add compulsive lying to the list and not knowing when to stop hurting, a great indicator. A healthy person has boundaries in terms of putting someone at risk, or their wellbeing and they would stop seeing it’s to much for someone. They don’t stop at all. Ruthlessness I would call it. In my case, my ex couldn’t also relate to animals in playful interaction much or have higher feelings about them. I read that as children it is common for them to torture animals. In an adult I also noticed that tho not torturing animals, he liked torturing mentally and pressing senstitive spots, it was bringing satisfaction to him, like probing a wound.
    For anyone needing to have an insight into such mind, I recommend reading a book ‘Confessions of a psychopath. A life spent hidden in plain sight”. It was written by M.E. Thomas, a successful psychopath academic lecturer from USA. She also has a blog to ‘help’ I suppose those who ponder over self-diagnosis and to maybe advise how to at least slightly see the human interaction with eyes of an empath, learn in by heart so to speak and interact with others by applying knowledge rather than feelings, because they are not capable of that. It also helps to understand it is a disease. A nasty one you want to stay away but still disease. Being a classic empath, I felt bad suspecting my ex of being a sociopath but reading the book only confirmed my suspicions that even his family was dismissive about. They chose to say ‘He is just not a good person’ rather than diagnose properly and help for less damage to be spread in people’s lives. He himself was saying numerous times to me that he used to be dangerous or that he wasn’t a good person and I never fully understood until afterwards.

    • Thank you, Jackson. Concise and covers it allpretty much all. That is personal topic to me, too. Took me 3 to 4 years to recover after such relationship. I would also add compulsive lying to the list and not knowing when to stop hurting, a great indicator. A healthy person has boundaries in terms of putting someone at risk, or their wellbeing and they would stop seeing it’s to much for someone. They don’t stop at all. Ruthlessness I would call it. In my case, my ex couldn’t also relate to animals in playful interaction much or have higher feelings about them. I read that as children it is common for them to torture animals. In an adult I also noticed that tho not torturing animals, he liked torturing mentally and pressing senstitive spots, it was bringing satisfaction to him, like probing a wound.
      For anyone needing to have an insight into such mind, I recommend reading a book ‘Confessions of a psychopath. A life spent hidden in plain sight”. It was written by M.E. Thomas, a successful psychopath academic lecturer from USA. She also has a blog to ‘help’ I suppose those who ponder over self-diagnosis and to maybe advise how to at least slightly see the human interaction with eyes of an empath, learn in by heart so to speak and interact with others by applying knowledge rather than feelings, because they are not capable of that. It also helps to understand it is a disease. A nasty one you want to stay away but still disease. Being a classic empath, I felt bad suspecting my ex of being a sociopath but reading the book only confirmed my suspicions that even his family was dismissive about. They chose to say ‘He is just not a good person’ rather than diagnose properly and help for less damage to be spread in people’s lives. He himself was saying numerous times to me that he used to be dangerous or that he wasn’t a good person and I never fully understood

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